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QueBIT Blog: Upgrading from Cognos Planning to IBM Planning Analytics #4

Posted by: Gary Quirke Jul 13, 2018 9:36:00 AM
Blog #4: The six best things from a CFO’s Perspective. As the CFO, maybe you have been happy with Cognos Planning (CP), or maybe you have not.  Maybe you are aware of the end user and administrator... Read More

Gary Quirke

Gary Quirke is Chief Executive Officer and founder of QueBIT Consulting. A Fellow of the Chartered Association of Certified Accountants, Gary has 20 years’ experience delivering best practice enterprise business analytics solutions to Fortune 500 companies. Gary’s experience with business analytics software dates back to 1991 and he is recognized as an expert in this field. A regular contributor and speaker at industry events, Gary’s experience and expertise covers a broad range of business sectors including Banking, Life Sciences, Retail, Healthcare, Automotive, Shipping and Consumer Packaged Goods. Gary launched QueBIT Consulting in 2001 with the goal to deliver industry leading business analytics solutions to companies of all sizes. Gary is proud of QueBIT’s achievements in delivering world class solutions to more than 350 very satisfied customers.
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QueBIT Blog: Upgrading from Cognos Planning to IBM Planning Analytics #3

Posted by Gary Quirke

Blog#3: The six best things from an Administrator’s Perspective.

Cognos Planning (formally known as Adaytum Planning) has had a good run, but the state-of-the-art solution, with respect to planning and forecasting systems, has moved on since the early 1990s. Today, we have higher expectations, including:

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Topics: Planning, planning analytics, Planning Analytics Workspace

QueBIT Blog: Upgrading from Cognos Planning to IBM Planning Analytics #2

Posted by Gary Quirke

Blog #2: The six best things from a User’s Perspective.

Cognos Planning (formally known as Adaytum Planning) has served many companies well since the early 1990’s, but is approaching the end of its life from an IBM support perspective, and the product is no longer being further developed by IBM.

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Topics: planning analytics

QueBIT Blog: Six Reasons to upgrade from Cognos Planning to Planning Analytics Now! #1

Posted by Gary Quirke

Blog #1: Introduction

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QueBIT Blog: Cloud 101: Defining the Differences Between IaaS, PaaS, and SaaS

Posted by Gary Quirke

In the cloud universe, where seemingly every IT function is “as a service” compatible, there are three main cloud service delivery models that businesses leverage every day to run their operations:

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Topics: Cloud

The Rise of Chief Analytics Officer (CAO)

Posted by Gary Quirke

The “C” in CEO, is short for “Chief”.  The Merriam Webster dictionary defines Chief to mean: Highest in rank or authority; most important; the person who is the leader of a group of people, of an organization, etc.  Today we are accustomed to the Chief Executive Officer (CEO), the Chief Financial Officer (CFO), the Chief Information Officer (CIO), the Chief Marketing Officer (CMO) and in some organizations other chiefs like the Chief Technology Officer (CTO), the Chief Strategy Officer (CSO) and the Chief Risk Officer (CRO).

Chiefs have been around since man first graced the earth.  However, chiefs in business, certainly ones with the word “chief” in their job title, are quite a recent thing.  A 1999 University of Michigan study written by David W. Allison and Blyden B. Potts found that in 1955 only one of the 200 largest industrial corporations in the United States used the title Chief Executive Officer (CEO) to denote its chief executive.  By 1975 all but one of these firms had a CEO.  A similar study from the University of Princeton written by Dirk M. Zorn found through an examination of 400 of the largest corporations, none of them had a Chief Financial Officer in 1964 but more than 80% did by the year 2000.  The main catalytic event was an ambiguous change in accounting rules in 1979 issued by the Federal Accounting Standards Board (FASB 33) in response to the corporate funding crisis of the 1970's.  As the need for financial controls became greater, companies needed to establish an authority at the top of their organizations that would be fully responsible for the compliance of control related regulations.

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